Monday, July 02, 2007

A Resume MUST: Be Truthful - A Lesson Learned

By Randi S. Lewis
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Why is it so important to tell the truth on your resume? The answer is simple: if you fabricate something on your resume, one way or another, your untruthfulness will be uncovered.
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Last week, the headmaster of an elite all-boys prep school in Maryland was asked to resign due to a non-academic fabrication on his resume. During an annual evaluation of the headmaster (an experienced educator with three academic degrees) it was discovered that he had NOT been a member of an intercollegiate hockey team, as he had noted on his resume and discussed in interviews at the time he was hired 6 years ago. Was it worth the fabrication? Of course not.
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Three years ago, a young lawyer was given three months to find another job because it was mutually agreed that it just wasn't working out. His supervisors agreed to give a favorable reference. When he first started looking for a job, he was still employed with the firm. So, it was accurate for him to indicate his employment dates were from Sept. 2002 - Present. But by the time he was poised to receive his first offer to join another firm, he had left his firm and his biography had been removed from the company website. This young lawyer did not advise the new company that he had left his current firm. In checking references, the new firm learned he was no longer employed. He didn't get the offer. Would he have landed the offer if he had let the firm know that he had a mutual agreement with his firm that he would be leaving at the end of the month? Maybe, particularly because his supervisors had agreed to give a favorable reference. But failing to provide pertinent information was as fatal here as it was to the headmaster, who told an affirmative untruth.
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LESSON LEARNED: TELL THE TRUTH.